Tuesday, August 6


The Confessions of Innocent Men

Unpacking a false confession 20 years later.


How Much Is a Life Worth?

A profile of Ken Feinberg, lawyer who specializes in determining compensation after tragedies and disasters.

Monday, August 5


The Ghost Rapes of Bolivia

The Mennonite women of the Manitoba Colony would awake with blood and semen stains, dried grass in their hair, and tiny bits of rope on their wrists and ankles. Their rapists, armed with a veterinary tranquilizer converted to spray form, were eight young men from their own community.


Taken by the State

The use and abuse of civil forfeiture.

Saturday, August 3


When Mom Has a Secret

Finding out your loved one is a notorious fugitive.

Friday, August 2


Did Goldman Sachs Overstep in Criminally Charging Its Ex-Programmer?

Shortly before leaving Goldman Sachs, Sergey Aleynikov downloaded around 32mb of source code from their high-frequency stock-trading system. Even as he was sent away for an eight year bid in federal prison, no one seemed to fully understand exactly what he did.


Subterranean Psychonaut

The strange saga of Gordon Todd Skinner, a psychedelic aficionado and government informant who is now serving time in prison for kidnapping and torturing his wife’s teenage lover.

Tuesday, July 30


Jeffrey Levitt Stole $15 Million

“Jeffrey Levitt stole and misappropriated a grand total of fourteen million, six hundred ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred forty-seven dollars and fifty-eight cents. He stole all that. It was the largest single white-collar crime in Maryland history, almost bringing down the state’s entire savings and loan industry.” And it still wasn’t enough.

Monday, July 29


A Hollywood Ending

An older brother’s murder and its aftermath.


The Serial Killer Has Second Thoughts: The Confessions of Thomas Quick

After a botched bank robbery in 1990, Sture Bergwall, aka Thomas Quick, confessed to a string of brutal crimes. He admitted to stabbings, stranglings, incest and cannibalism. He was convicted of eight murders in all, and after the final trial he went silent for nearly a decade. But a few years ago, Bergwall came forward again—there was one more secret he had to tell.


Trial by Twitter

Was justice served in Steubenville?