Monday, April 25

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A Boy of Unusual Vision

Calvin Stanley is a fourth-grader at Cross Country Elementary School. He rides a bike, watches TV, plays video games and does just about everything other 10-year-old boys do. Except see.

The winner of the 1985 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing, online for the first time.

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When Bitcoin Grows Up

Money is an idea that we all agree to believe in.

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The Secret Shame of Middle-Class Americans

“Nearly half of Americans would have trouble finding $400 to pay for an emergency. I’m one of them.”

Sunday, April 24

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The Massive Land Deal That Could Change the West Forever

In Utah, an unlikely leader is looking to end the state’s land-use wars.

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Iceland’s Water Cure

Happiness is a warm pool.

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1,112 and Counting

A cri de cœur on AIDS: “If we don’t act immediately, then we face our approaching doom.”

Saturday, April 23

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Mount Impossible: How a Disabled Veteran Conquered Kilimanjaro

Summiting one of the world’s toughest peaks gave Julian Torres something an IED blast in Afghanistan had taken away.

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Everybody Is a Star: How the Rock Club First Avenue Made Minneapolis the Center of Music in the ’80s

The fabled venue where the Replacements, Hüsker Dü, and Prince emerged.

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In the Footsteps of a Killer

From 1976 to 1986, one of the most violent serial criminals in American history terrorized communities throughout California. He was little known, never caught, and might still be out there. The author, along with several others, couldn’t stop working on the case.

Friday, April 22

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I Am Your Conscious, I Am Love

“A paean 2 Prince.”

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Unfriendly Climate

Katharine Hayhoe is one of the country’s most influential atmospheric scientists, spreading the word about the effects of climate change. She’s also an evangelical Christian.

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The Internet Really Has Changed Everything. Here’s the Proof.

The writer returns to his remote North Dakota hometown’s high school, then isolated with a graduating class of only 28, now even smaller but connected by the internet.