Saturday, April 28

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A profile of the hardworking Samuel L. Jackson, whose movies have grossed more than any actor’s ever.

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Competing teams, some powered by billionaires and some by open-sourced code and volunteers, race to land a robot on the surface and claim a massive prize from Google.

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An uncertain future for the retailer.

"Sears was so powerful and so successful at one time that they could build the tallest building in the world that they did not need," says James Schrager, a professor of entrepreneurship and strategy at the University of Chicago's Booth School of Business. "The Sears Tower stands as a monument to how quickly fortunes can change in retailing, and as a very graphic example of what can go wrong if you don't 'watch the store' every minute of every day."

Friday, April 27

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On the last weekend of April 2011, two things happened in Washington D.C.: the annual White House Correspondents Dinner and the decision to raid Osama bin Laden’s compound. This is the story of how both transpired.

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A profile of the Mexican newsweekly, a “lone voice” in reporting on the narcos.

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On having sex with your high school girlfriend – and paying the price for years to come.

Thursday, April 26

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In 1979, a Pulitzer was given to “an unnamed photographer of United Press International” who documented a mass execution in Iran.

His name is Jahangir Razmi – and, nearly three decades later, he wants the credit.

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A portrait of Trayvon Martin’s killer.

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The infuriating tale of Muncie, Indiana: When public institutions fail.

Wednesday, April 25

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A sociobiologist on how we evolved into artists.

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Alabama’s chemical-endangerment law was passed to protect kids from meth labs. But is the prosecution of about 60 mothers – and the definition of “child” extended to “unborn child” – pushing its boundaries too far?