The New Republic

73 articles
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My Terrifying Night With Afghanistan's Only Female Warlord

Inside the stronghold of Commander Pigeon, “collector of lost and exiled men.”

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Louisiana Is Disappearing Into the Sea

“Since 1932, the Gulf of Mexico has swallowed 2,300 square miles of the state’s wetlands, an area larger than Delaware. If no action is taken, the missing Delaware will become a missing Connecticut, and then a missing Vermont.”

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Crimetown, U.S.A.

The corruption of Congressman James Traficant.

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How to Succeed in Silicon Valley Without Really Trying

Tech investors gave Seth Bannon, co-founder of the seemingly surging startup Amicus, over four million dollars, despite knowing almost nothing about him.

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The New Racism

How the GOP took control of state politics in Alabama, leaving black lawmakers — and their constituents — powerless.

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"I Have Sinned Against the Lord and Against You! Will You Forgive Me?"

Adriaan Vlok, a former apartheid leader, seeks redemption.

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Hell Is an Understatement

A dispatch from the Central African Republic.

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Year of the Pigskin

A season with the American Football League of China.

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The French As Dostoevsky Saw Them

“Americans find it hard to believe that foreigners are unalterably foreign, for they have seen generations of immigrants who became Americans.”

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The Fall of the House of Moon


A history of scandal and civil war within the first family of the Unification Church.

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Should This Inmate Get a State-Financed Sex Change Operation?

The complicated case of Michelle Kosilek, a murderer fighting for sexual reassignment surgery.

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On the Ground With Syria's News Smugglers

How citizen journalists are covering the war.

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The Andrew Wylie Rules

An interview with the literary agent about the state of the book industry and how, at least for him, it continues to be quite lucrative.

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This Man Moved to a Desert Island in Order to Vanish. Here's What Happened.

A two-week island experience involving a 70-year-old interloper, his mannequin girlfriend, a couple of dogs and very little else.

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'You're Done Banging Superheroes, Baby'

Meet Mark Millar, the brains behind our era’s most violent, ingenious comics.

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The Last Days of Big Law

The money has dried up, the models are broken and “there are simply many, many more high-priced lawyers today than there is high-priced legal work.” On the end of an era.

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The Art of Translation

On the sins of the lazy translator.

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The Amish Are Getting Fracked

Their religion prohibits lawsuits. The energy companies know it.

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Subu Must Die

How Georgia halted its drug epidemic, but not its addicts–and what the U.S. might learn from their efforts.

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The Hell of American Day Care

On the barely regulated business of looking after kids.

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For Better or Worse?

The case for gay marriage.

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"You Have All the Reasons to Be Angry"

The fight for South Africa’s future.

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Original Sin

How Republicans came to be the party of white people.

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Exit Interview: Timothy Geithner

The outgoing treasury secretary on his financial crisis regrets, putting policy before politics, and whether Washington will ever be able to strike a grand bargain.

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Baudrillard and Babes at the Consumer Electronics Show

A trip to CES, “what a World’s Fair might look like if brands were more important than countries.”

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The Rise of DIY Abortions

With abortion access limited in many states, should some home abortions still be a crime?

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To Die For

Robert Blake, Bonny Lee Bakley, and the misery of celebrity.

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V.S. Naipaul on the Arab Spring, Authors He Loathes, and the Books He Will Never Write

“Oh God, everybody hates Jane Austen. They don’t have the balls to say it.”

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Has Hollywood Murdered the Movies?

Blockbusters in the age of “corporate irony.”

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Georgia's Next Leader May Be a Billionaire Zookeeper with Albino Rapper Children

A profile of Bidzina Ivanishvili.

Published originally in GQ Russia.
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The Cranky Wisdom of Peter Kaplan

The former editor of the New York Observer, profiled.

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Smugged by Reality

On New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik.

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Prosecutorial Indiscretion

The story of Donald Smaltz, an independent prosecutor run amok.

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The Square and the Flair

On Mitt Romney’s top strategist—a steroid-dabbling, screenwriting bon vivant.

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Confessions of an Ex-Mormon

A personal history of “America’s most misunderstood religion.”

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Sorority Row

On the enduring political influence and entrenched racism of the Greek system at the University of Alabama.

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The Visionary

A profile of Salam Fayyad, the Palestinian Prime Minister.

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How They Did It

The inside story of the Affordable Care Act.

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Toxic

An investigation into Erin Brockovich and the lawsuits that made her famous.

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This American Lie

Fact-checking David Sedaris.

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Hitler Is Dead

All violence is not like all other violence. Every Jewish death is not like every other Jewish death. To believe otherwise is to revive the old typological thinking about Jewish history, according to which every enemy of the Jews is the same enemy, and there is only one war, and it is a war against extinction, and it is a timeless war.
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The Moral Equivalent to Football

A former first-string tackle considers the green zone as a war zone:

Just as football has evolved in accordance with the evolving business ethic of American society, so has it evolved in accordance with the changing strategic assumptions about war. The development (or rebirth) of the T-formation in football coincided almost exactly with the development of a new era of mobility and speed in warfare best exemplified in the Blitzkrieg tactics of the German armies in Europe in 1939-40. The T-formation soon overwhelmed the “Maginot Line” mentality of traditional football, based as it was on rigid lines and massive concentrations of defensive and offensive power.

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Laissez-Faire Aesthetics

A critical look at the contemporary art marketplace.

The trouble is that a business model has come to drive the entire art world, and like the corporate executive who regards the launch of each new product as a challenge to the success of the last one, because you must keep growing or you will die, the arts community finds itself in a state of permanent anxiety. There always has to be a new artist whom the media will embrace as enthusiastically as they embraced Warhol; there always has to be a show that will top the excitement generated by the last blockbuster at the Modern or the Met.

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The Collector

He was the world’s foremost collector of presidential memorabilia, an outsider with a pathological need to fit in. He was also a thief.

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Give All

James Wood on Saul Bellow:

One realizes, with a shock, that Bellow has taught one how to see and how to hear, has opened the senses. Until this moment one had not really thought of the looseness of a lightbulb filament, one had not heard the saliva bubbling in the harmonica, one had not seen well enough the nose pitted with black pores, and the demolition ball’s slow, heavy selection of its victims. A dozen good writers–Updike, DeLillo, others–can render you the window of a fish shop, and do it very well; but it is Bellow’s genius to see the lobsters “crowded to the glass” and their “feelers bent” by that glass–to see the riot of life in the dead peace of things.

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The Turnaround Men

A charismatic entrepreneur, an ex-con turned devout Christian, and the politicians who championed them.

The story of a $36 billion Ponzi scheme in Minnesota.

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Hemingway Reports Spain

THEY SAY YOU never hear the one that hits you. That's true of bullets, because, if you hear them, they are already past. But your correspondent heard the last shell that hit this hotel. He heard it start from the battery, then come with a whistling incommg roar like a subway train to crash against the cornice and shower the room with broken glass and plaster. And while the glass still tinkled down and you listened for the next one to start, you realized that now finally you were back in Madrid.
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Wealthcare

On the phenomenal, disturbing influence of Ayn Rand.

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The Permanent Candidate

What makes Rick Perry run?

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Pimp My Ride

Notes from the campaign trail in Nevada with Ron Paul.

Part of Longform.org's guide to the 2012 GOP field at Slate.
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All Over the Map

What are the foreign policy views of Michele Bachmann, Tim Pawlenty, Rick Perry and Mitt Romney?

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The Hustler

No one argues before the Supreme Court more than Tommy Goldstein.

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The Great Democracy Meltdown

Why the world is becoming less free. The cover story from the June 2011 print edition of The New Republic, available on the web specially for readers of Longform.org.
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The Struggle for Mexico

Has Mexico become a failed state?

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The Choke Artist

Henry Heimlich saved untold choking victimes when he invented his maneuver in 1974. Since then, he’s searched in vain for another miracle treatment—pushing ethical boundaries along the way. Now at the end of his career, Heimlich has hired an investigator to find an anonymous critic working full-time to destroy his legacy.

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The Heir

One of most popular Libyan figures amongst Western intellectuals and democracy advocates is… Qaddafi’s second son, Saif.

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The God In the Trash

The oracular works of Philip K. Dick.

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The Rape and Rescue of Kuwait City

Reporting from Kuwait on the week of its liberation, a brutal account of the atrocities committed during seven months of Iraqi occupation.

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Return of the Republicans

“For the first time since the Civil War, the United States has a political party that is ideologically cohesive, disciplined, and determined to take power, even at the cost of disrupting the political system.”

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The Worst Case

How health care reform could be repealed.

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The Idealist

How a young state rep from Missouri, seemingly guaranteed political greatness, ended up behind bars.

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Mikhail Khodorkovsky's Day in Court

Mikhail Khodorkovsky, oil magnate and once the richest man in Russia, delivers a speech from prison, where he has lived since 2003.

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J-School Confidential

Michael Lewis goes undercover at Columbia.

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For the Love of Culture

Why our entire understanding of copyright is due for an overhaul.

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D’Escoto Inferno

Sandinista, reverend, and president of the U.N. General Assembly.

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Going Under

Anesthesiologists, in hugely disproportionate numbers compared to other doctors, are getting high.

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The Healer

After a racial hazing incident, the first black head of South Africa’s University of Free State confronts the myths of the reconciliation era.

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Empty Garden

Lance Stephenson, the latest in a long line of Coney Island basketball prodigies, carries a burden none of his predecessors did: restoring New York City’s reputation as the hoops capital of the world.