Fine Art

42 articles
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Interview: Yayoi Kusama

An interview with the Japanese artist, who has resided in a mental institution since committing herself in 1975.

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The Greatest Fake-Art Scam in History?

How a couple made millions on uncanny forgeries.

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Portrait of the Artist as a Postman

A profile of Kermit Oliver, a reclusive, critically acclaimed artist who designs scarves for Hermès and works nights at the Waco post office.

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So You Think You Can Paint

Inside ArtPrize, a competition in Michigan that’s either a “naked bid to buy cultural cachet in a flyover-country backwater” or a “populist wresting of aesthetic judgment from the snobbery of elites in New York and Los Angeles,” depending on who you ask.

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The Electric Pencil

The story of Edward Deeds, a state mental hospital patient and artistic genius.

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Interview: Paula Cooper

Talking with the influential New York gallerist.

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An Odd Bird

When U.S. customs law met abstract art in the form of a bird, “shimmering and soaring toward the ceiling while the lawyers debated whether it was an ‘original sculpture’ or a metal ‘article or ware not specially provided for’ under the 1922 Tariff Act.”

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Sponge-Fraud!

The curious case of SpongeBob SquarePants illustrator Todd White, three ninjas, and an art caper.

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Experience & Innocence

An interview with John Waters.

Real life is seeing and art is looking. If you’re successful, it’s a magic trick: you take one thing, and you put it in here, and it changes in one second, and then you can never look at that thing again the same way. That is what art is to me.

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The Ultimate Counterfeiter Isn't a Crook—He's an Artist

A painter’s dogged, doomed pursuit of the perfect $100 bill.

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Art for Everybody

On the empire built by “Painter of Light” Thomas Kinkade.

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On the Market

An essay on working at Sotheby’s.

Art pricing is not absolute magic; there are certain rules, which to an outsider can sound parodic. Paintings with red in them usually sell for more than paintings without red in them. Warhol’s women are worth more, on average, than Warhol’s men. The reason for this is a rhetorical question, asked in a smooth continental accent: “Who would want the face of some man on their wall?”