Google

28 articles
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Privacy, memory, data and advertising—how the modern web has become a Ponzi scheme and how we might be able to fix it.

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How the Google co-founder, forced out of a leadership role in 2001, came back to run the company 10 years later.

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The long road to Google’s self-driving car.

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The con man who cost Google $500 million.

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The writer, entering her thirties single and adrift, heads to San Francisco to spend time with Kink.com’s Princess Donna Dolore and attend a gangbang “where all the men were dressed as panda bears.”

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For the first time, the giants of the tech industry are spending more on creating, buying, and fighting patents than they are on R&D.

Part of New York Times' ongoing iEconomy series.
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How Google’s utopian/dystopian plan to scan the world’s books failed and the Harvard-led team that’s picking up the pieces.

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Competing teams, some powered by billionaires and some by open-sourced code and volunteers, race to land a robot on the surface and claim a massive prize from Google.

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How the U.S. government used a serial con who was caught running a mail-order steroid pharmacy in Mexico to prove that Google was knowingly placing ads for illegal drugs.

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On YouTube’s shift towards professionally created content.

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Apple vs. Google vs. Facebook vs. Amazon.

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On the Google conundrum:

It’s clearly wrong for all the information in all the world’s books to be in the sole possession of a single company. It’s clearly not ideal that only one company in the world can, with increasing accuracy, translate text between 506 different pairs of languages. On the other hand, if Google doesn’t do these things, who will?

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On how search and advertising became indistinguishable, the finer points of not being evil, and why privacy is by nature immeasurable. How Google made us the product:

“Google conquered the advertising world with nothing more than applied mathematics,” wrote Chris Anderson, the editor of Wired. “It didn’t pretend to know anything about the culture and conventions of advertising—it just assumed that better data, with better analytical tools, would win the day. And Google was right.”

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“The best minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click ads.”

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The next frontier of search is… everything. Voice recognition, image recognition, and why Google’s data set is one of the most valuable scientific tools of our age.

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The challenges facing the historians of the internet.

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How J.C. Penney gamed Google and became the top result for searches on everything from “area rugs” to “skinny jeans.”

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A requiem for the ‘content portal’ era.

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A working definition of ‘net neutrality’, a bestiary of the major players, and why the issue isn’t a cut and dry case of good vs. evil.

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Where the actual online money is centralized, and where Google will have to go to continue chasing it.

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DecorMyEyes is a online eyewear store with an unusual business plan; the owner harasses and intimidates customers who complain in order to get negative reviews posted across the web, in turn making his website more visible to Google searchers.

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The perpetually underpaid author takes a moonlighting job with Demand Media, publisher of search-engine optimized articles with titles like “Hair Styles for Women Over 50 With Glasses”, absurdity ensues.

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Google’s founders and CEO as they moved from the search business into… everything.

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One of the founders of Google discovered that he carried a gene that meant a 50% chance of developing Parkinson’s. In response, he is working to change and expedite the way that Parkinson’s research is conducted.

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Yeah, you’ve seen that headline before. The difference? This time it’s not journalists trying to do the saving. It’s Google.