journalism

23 articles
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Janet Malcolm: The Art of Nonfiction No. 4

“I think you are asking me, in the most tactful way possible, about my own ­aggression and malice. What can I do but plead guilty? I don’t know ­whether journalists are more aggressive and malicious than people in other professions. We are certainly not a ‘helping profession.’ If we help anyone, it is ourselves, to what our subjects don’t realize they are letting us take. I am hardly the first writer to have noticed the not-niceness of journalists. Tocqueville wrote about the despicableness of American journalists in Democracy in America. In Henry James’s satiric novel The Reverberator, a wonderful rascally journalist named George M. Flack appears. I am only one of many contributors to this critique. I am also not the only journalist contributor. Tom Wolfe and Joan Didion, for instance, have written on the subject. Of course, being aware of your rascality doesn’t excuse it.”

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Once Upon a Time in the Middle East

On driving (and walking) in the Middle East – from Syria to Lebanon, across Saudi Arabia to Dammam, in a taxi through war-torn Beirut.

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Shooting the Messengers

Is being a war correspondent worth the risk?

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The New Yorker Records: Historical Note

A history of The New Yorker and its editors, from founder Harold Ross through Tina Brown.

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How Do You Explain Gene Weingarten?

A profile of the eccentric Gene Weingarten, the only person to twice win the Pulitzer for feature writing.

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Stop Forcing Journalists to Conceal Their Views From the Public

Caitlin Curran was fired from WNYC for attending an Occupy Wall Street protest. The author explains why her boss was wrong.

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The road ahead for The Huffington Post

Nine months after the AOL merger, here’s a progress report.

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The United States of America vs. Bill Keller

Inside the complicated world of running The New York Times.

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The Kingdom of Silence

The story of three months spent training reporters in Saudi Arabia, where the press is far from free. “I suspected that behind the closed gates of Saudi society there was a social revolution in the making. With some guidance, I thought, these journalists could help inspire change.”

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Shattered Glass

At 25, Stephen Glass was a reporter wunderkind, regularly filing incredible pieces for the largest magazines. When suspicion fell on his sources, things started to really get strange. It wasn’t just sources and organizations he was inventing, but whole stories.

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Smuggler, Forger, Writer, Spy

A profile of Anas Aremeyaw, an investigative journalist in Ghana who’s willing to do anything–and pose as anyone–to get the story.

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J-School Confidential

Michael Lewis goes undercover at Columbia.

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The Hamster Wheel

In the last decade, newsrooms across the country have adopted a “do more with less” strategy. It’s a kamikaze mission.

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Whirl

For sixty years, the weekly Evening Whirl attacked the drug lords, whoring preachers, and hypocritical bourgeoisie of St. Louis’ black community, sometimes in rhyming Iambic couplets.

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Correcting the Record

The New York Times reveals the deception of 27-year-old reporter Jayson Blair.

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From a Bunker to Blockbusters

The backstory of the publication of WikiLeaks’s Afghanistan logs.

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Out of Iraq

A war correspondent decides to rent a house in Baghdad to save money. Complications ensue.

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Pulitzer Prize Is Withdrawn

On September 28, 1980, the Washington Post published a story by an ambitious young reporter about an 8-year-old boy addicted to heroin. The story won a Pulitzer. The boy didn’t exist.

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Hack

The nihilistic confessions of a presidential campaign reporter who covered Giuliani, Huckabee, and Clinton for Newsweek.

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Lost Exile

The rise and fall of The Exile, Russia’s angriest English-language newspaper.

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All The Dirt That’s Fit To Print

How the National Enquirer became a 2010 Pulitzer contender without straying from its roots as a supermarket tabloid.

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Look at me!

A young journalist’s low-paid odyssey through publications from the Hong Kong iMail to Gawker adrift in the “nothing-based economy.”

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How to Save the News

Yeah, you’ve seen that headline before. The difference? This time it’s not journalists trying to do the saving. It’s Google.