A screenshot of the Longform App in a stylized iPhone

Our Free New App for iPhone and iPad

  • Every pick from Longform.org
  • Follow any publisher or writer
  • All articles available offline
Download on the App Store

Newspapers & Magazines

105 articles
Avatar_57x57

Scenes From My Life in Porn

Gang-bang buffet tables, deeply earnest 'Letters to the Editor,' ghost-writing Kierkegaard references into model bios in Barely Legal, and how a half-decade of reviewing porn eroded the thin line between the author's alter egos and self.

Avatar_57x57

Covering the Cops

A profile of Edna Buchanan, a Pulitzer Prize-winning crime reporter for the Miami Herald during its heyday.

Avatar_57x57

Changing Times

A profile of Jill Abramson from her first weeks as executive editor of The New York Times.

Avatar_57x57

Roger Ebert: The Essential Man

A profile of the late critic.

Avatar_57x57

In Conversation: Tina Brown

A wide-ranging chat with the magazine editor.

Avatar_57x57

In Cold Type

The backstory of “The Duke in His Domain,” Truman Capote’s 1957 New Yorker profile of Marlon Brando.

Avatar_57x57

Proust Wasn’t a Neuroscientist. Neither Was Jonah Lehrer.

The allure of conclusion-shaping and a wunderkind’s fall.

Avatar_57x57

The Cranky Wisdom of Peter Kaplan

The former editor of the New York Observer, profiled.

Avatar_57x57

The Sometimes-Picayune

“Has anybody in Westchester County ever called the New York Times his or her ‘friend’? I realize that the rest of America, in its post-Katrina fatigue, is pretty tired of hearing New Orleanians, the city’s acolytes and defenders, always carrying on about how it’s the most unique city in America, but, the fact is, it is. Get over it.

And so, too, is its newspaper.”

Avatar_57x57

Interview: Katherine Boo

On the craft of reporting poverty.

Avatar_57x57

Cigarettes and Alcohol: Andy Capp

“Reg Smythe was the greatest British newspaper strip cartoonist of the 20th Century – and second only to Peanuts’ Charles Schulz on a global scale. So why don’t we treat him that way?”

Avatar_57x57

Helenism

The life’s work of Cosmo editor-in-chief Helen Gurley Brown.

Avatar_57x57

99 Ways to Be Naughty in Kazakhstan

How Cosmo, with 64 international editions and a readership that would make it the world’s 16th largest country, conquered the globe.

Avatar_57x57

The New Yorker Records: Historical Note

A history of The New Yorker and its editors, from founder Harold Ross through Tina Brown.

Avatar_57x57

Entertainment for Women

The author interviews her mother about life as a secretary at Playboy in 1960s New York City.

Avatar_57x57

The Dweebs on the Bus

The taming of the political reporter.

Avatar_57x57

The Heather Graham Story

A self-conscious celebrity profile.

Avatar_57x57

The Underground Press

On the mid-sixties birth of America’s underground newspaper movement and the rise of The Realist, East Village Other, Berkeley Barb, and more.

Avatar_57x57

The Paris Review, the Cold War and the CIA

Uncovered letters reveal ties between the literary magazine and the CIA’s Congress for Cultural Freedom.

Avatar_57x57

Playboy Goes West

As Playboy magazine moves to Los Angeles, the writer considers its place in the Midwest.

No other general interest magazine tried to reach readers in the wide swathe of land between New York and California. “It was a Midwestern magazine, designed for people there. If you wanted it to be hip, edgy, go toe-to-toe with GQ, you were making a mistake,” said Chris Napolitano, a former executive editor who began at Playboy in 1988.

Avatar_57x57

A New York Times Whodunit

On the ouster of CEO Janet Robinson and the company’s financial woes.

Avatar_57x57

It Took a Village

A history of the Village Voice.

Avatar_57x57

Alone, 'Riodoce' Covers the Drug Cartel Beat

A profile of the Mexican newsweekly, a “lone voice” in reporting on the narcos.

Avatar_57x57

How Do You Explain Gene Weingarten?

A profile of the eccentric Gene Weingarten, the only person to twice win the Pulitzer for feature writing.

Avatar_57x57

Flathead

Matt Taibbi on Thomas Friedman.

Avatar_57x57

Mail Supremacy

On the Daily Mail’s dominance of England.

Avatar_57x57

This American Lie

Fact-checking David Sedaris.

Avatar_57x57

Ghosts in the Newsroom

Can The Washington Post be saved?

Avatar_57x57

The Last Gentleman

On New Yorker writer George W. S. Trow’s descent into madness.

Avatar_57x57

The Most Famous Story We Never Told

Sixty-nine years after publication, Fortune revisits “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men” – a story it commissioned but did not run.

Avatar_57x57

L.A. Pedophile Bust Dismantles International Child Porn Ring

How investigators nabbed a key member of a group called “Lost Boy.”

Avatar_57x57

The Mystery Woman Behind the Murdoch Mess

A profile of Rebekah Brooks, who started as a secretary at News of the World and became CEO of News International by 41, developing an incredibly close relationship with Rupert Murdoch along the way.

Avatar_57x57

Soft Porn, Hardening Hearts

The dissolution of Brooklyn softcore skin-mag Jacques and the marriage of the couple that created it.

Avatar_57x57

Peter Braunstein, WWD Writer Turned Tabloid Monster, Still Has Issues

A former colleague visits the ‘Fire Fiend’ in prison.

Avatar_57x57

Confidence Game

The limited vision of the news gurus.

Avatar_57x57

How We Were All Misled

On Michael Lewis and the global financial crisis.

Previously: The Michael Lewis World Tour of Economic Collapse
Avatar_57x57

How I Ended Up Leaving Poynter

The Starbucks-fueled saga of how Jim Romenesko, beloved journalism blogger, took an early retirement.

Avatar_57x57
Avatar_57x57

How Do You Spell Ms.

An oral history of Ms. magazine.

Avatar_57x57

Norman Mailer Sent Me

In 1972, James Wolcott arrived in New York armed with a letter of recommendation from Norman Mailer. He hoped to land a job at The Village Voice. Excerpted from his memoir, Lucking Out.

How lucky I was, arriving in New York just as everything was about to go to hell. I had no idea how fortunate I was at the time, eaten up as I was by my own present-tense concerns and taking for granted the lively decay, the intense dissonance, that seemed like normality.

Avatar_57x57

It's Good to Be Michael Lewis

On the writer and his impact on his subjects.

Avatar_57x57

The Gossip Behind the Gossip

An oral history of “Page Six.”

Avatar_57x57

The Journalist and the Spies

The death of the journalist who exposed dark secrets about Islamic extremism in Pakistan’s military.

Avatar_57x57

I Was Born Inside the Movie of My Life

Extracted from the author’s memoir, Life Itself.

The British satirist Auberon Waugh once wrote a letter to the editor of the Daily Telegraph asking readers to supply information about his life between birth and the present, explaining that he was writing his memoirs and had no memories from those years. I find myself in the opposite position. I remember everything. All my life I've been visited by unexpected flashes of memory unrelated to anything taking place at the moment. These retrieved moments I consider and replace on the shelf.

Avatar_57x57

The Big Party

Life inside the original Playboy Mansion.

Avatar_57x57

It's Spreading

The anatomy of a 1930 epidemic that wasn’t:

Was parrot fever really something to worry about? Reading the newspaper, it was hard to say. “not contagious in man,” the Times announced. “Highly contagious,” the Washington Post said. Who knew? Nobody had ever heard of it before. It lurked in American homes. It came from afar. It was invisible. It might kill you. It made a very good story. In the late hours of January 8th, editors at the Los Angeles Times decided to put it on the front page: “two women and man in Annapolis believed to have 'parrot fever.'"

Avatar_57x57

Interview: Gloria Steinem

SHRIVER: Regarding your Playboy exposé, I know you've discussed this a great deal, but I'd like to ask you this: You've said that you were glad you did it. What role do you think that exposé played in your early career and the notoriety you've achieved? Is there a similar exposé that someone could do today--something that would be as shocking? STEINEM: It took me a very long time to be glad. At first, it was such a gigantic mistake from a career point of view that I really regretted it. I'd just begun to be taken seriously as a freelance writer, but after the Playboy article, I mostly got requests to go underground in some other semi-sexual way. It was so bad that I returned an advance to turn the Playboy article into a paperback, even though I had to borrow the money. Even now, people ask why I was a Bunny, Right-Wingers still describe me only as a former Bunny, and you're still asking me about it-almost a half-century later. But feminism did make me realize that I was glad I did it--because I identified with all the women who ended up an underpaid waitress in too-high heels and  a costume that was too tight to breathe in. Most were just trying to make a living and had no other way of doing it. I'd made up a background as a secretary, and the woman who interviewed me asked, "Honey, if you can type, why would you want to work here?" In the sense that we're all identified too much by our outsides instead of our insides and are mostly in underpaid service jobs, I realized we're all Bunnies--so yes, I'm glad I did it. If a writer wants to do a similar exposé now, there's no shortage of stories that need telling. For instance, go as a pregnant woman into so-called crisis pregnancy centers and record what you're told to scare or force you not to choose an abortion-including harassing you, calling your family or employer. Or pretend to be a woman with a criminal record and see how difficult it is to get a job. Or use a homeless center as an address and see what happens in your life. Or work at an ordinary service job in the pink-collar ghetto, as Barbara Ehrenreich did in Nickel and Dimed. But be warned that if you're a woman journalist and you choose an underground job that's related to sex or looks, you may find it hard to shake the very thing you were exposing.
Avatar_57x57

Hack Work

On Rupert Murdoch and the tabloid culture he created in the U.K.

Avatar_57x57

The Pirate

A profile of Rupert Murdoch from 1995, as he fought monopoly charges in the U.S. and U.K. and prepared to expand his empire into China.

Murdoch is a pirate; he will cunningly circumvent rules, and sometimes principles, to get his way, as his recent adventures in China demonstrate.

Avatar_57x57

The Raging Septuagenarian

A profile of Rupert Murdoch, written before his empire began to crumble.

Avatar_57x57

The Dark Arts

Inside Rupert Murdoch’s News of the World phone-hacking scandal.

Avatar_57x57

The Birth of 'The New Journalism'; Eyewitness Report by Tom Wolfe

Tom Wolfe on the development of ”New Journalism,” an unconventional reporting style which he helped to pioneer.

I had the feeling, rightly or wrongly, that I was doing things no one had ever done before in journalism. I used to try to imagine the feeling readers must have had upon finding all this carrying on and cutting up in a Sunday supplement. I liked that idea. I had no sense of being a part of any normal journalistic or literary environment.

Avatar_57x57

The Life and Death of The American Spectator

The rise and dissolution of the magazine that nearly took down a president.

Avatar_57x57

The Buzz Factory

This past Memorial Day weekend, Steven T. Florio, the president and CEO of Conde Nast Publications, made a dramatic change at The New Yorker, the most illustrious of the 17 magazines he runs for billionaire S.I. "Si" Newhouse Jr. He fired his own brother.
Avatar_57x57
Avatar_57x57

The Adventures of Maer Roshan, Editorial Boy Wonder

A profile of the founding editor of Radar and current editor of The Fix, penned by a former employee.

Avatar_57x57

The Greatest Paper That Ever Died

“Radically brilliant. Absurdly ahead of its time. Ridiculously poorly planned.” An oral history of the National Sports Daily.

Avatar_57x57

On John Ross

John Ross, rebel reporter, became the sort of devoted gringo scribe who would give up drugs and drinking in order to better write about the native revolutionaries; the sort of man who used dolls to preach armed revolution to high schoolers in the weeks after September 11th.
Avatar_57x57

The United States of America vs. Bill Keller

Inside the complicated world of running The New York Times.

Avatar_57x57

What I Learned in Joplin

A reporter on his first time covering a disaster.

Avatar_57x57

Journalism and Morality

Confessions of a yellow journalist:

Let me say that I did very little faking, although there was no special prejudice against it, so long as the fake wasn't libelous.

Avatar_57x57

John McPhee: The Art of Non-Fiction No. 3

An interview with McPhee on his writing process, how he got his start at The New Yorker, and why he never understood how New Journalism could be called a revolution. “Anytime I was called a New Journalist I winced a little with embarrassment.”

Avatar_57x57

Untimely

Henry Luce and Time vs. Harold Ross and The New Yorker. What was at stake in the epic magazine rivalry of the 20th century?

Avatar_57x57

4 Times Journalists Held in Libya Faced Brutality

No one really knows the script for days like these, and neither did we.
Avatar_57x57

Creative Indeed

A profile of Grace Coddington, creative director of Vogue and break-out star of The September Issue.

Avatar_57x57

Learning to Love the (Shallow, Divisive, Unreliable) New Media

Is it time to end the mourning period for old media?

Avatar_57x57

Rules of Misbehavior

How Dan Savage became America’s leading ethicist.

Avatar_57x57

From Libya With Love

What did $3M paid to a US consulting firm get Qaddafi? A glowing profile in The New Republic, written by a Harvard professor, who travelled to Tripoli to interview him. On the consulting company’s dime. Which he failed to disclose.

Avatar_57x57

The Dissenters

On the future of the liberal Israeli newspaper Haartez.

Avatar_57x57

The Kingdom of Silence

The story of three months spent training reporters in Saudi Arabia, where the press is far from free. “I suspected that behind the closed gates of Saudi society there was a social revolution in the making. With some guidance, I thought, these journalists could help inspire change.”

Avatar_57x57

Gay Talese, The Art of Nonfiction No. 2

The original new journalist on his start at the Times, his daily writing routine, and why he’s always taken notes on shirt boards.

Avatar_57x57

Dealing With Julian Assange and the Secrets He Spilled

On the cloak and dagger dealings between The New York Times and WikiLeaks. Adapted from Executive Editor Bill Keller’s forthcoming ebook, Open Secrets: WikiLeaks, War and American Diplomacy: Complete and Updated Coverage from The New York Times.

Avatar_57x57

Martin Peretz Is Not Sorry About Anything

A primer on Peretz, longtime owner/editor of The New Republic, committed Zionist, and author of the line “Muslim life is cheap.”

Avatar_57x57

Interview: George Lois

George Lois never actually worked at Esquire, he simply designed the most iconic magazine covers of the 60s as a moonlighting gig while revolutionizing (and, generally pissing off) the advertising industry by day.

Avatar_57x57

The Man Who Spilled the Secrets

The backstory on Julian Assange’s relationship with the Guardian and the New York Times.

Avatar_57x57

Not All Smurfs and Sunshine

A profile of Esquire features writer Chris Jones. Plus: the Jones archive on Longform.org.

Avatar_57x57

What's Tweeting Courtland Milloy?

A veteran black Metro columnist, adrift in a rapidly shifting D.C., rankles an incoming generation of gentrificationists.

Avatar_57x57

Bravo L’Artiste

A review of several books on Rupert Murdoch first criticizes the authors for not grasping the many sides of their subject, then offers a thesis of its own. He’s “not so much a man, or a cultural force, as a portrait of the modern world.”

Avatar_57x57

The Long Tail

The article that spawned a school of thought; an elegy for the age of the megahit and a primer for the niche-based future.

Avatar_57x57

Shattered Glass

At 25, Stephen Glass was a reporter wunderkind, regularly filing incredible pieces for the largest magazines. When suspicion fell on his sources, things started to really get strange. It wasn’t just sources and organizations he was inventing, but whole stories.

Avatar_57x57

Smuggler, Forger, Writer, Spy

A profile of Anas Aremeyaw, an investigative journalist in Ghana who’s willing to do anything–and pose as anyone–to get the story.

Avatar_57x57

Tragedy at VQR

The managing editor’s suicide has received extensive press coverage, in part because the story appeared to be a relatively simple one: his boss was a bully. It was more complicated than that.

Avatar_57x57

The Hamster Wheel

In the last decade, newsrooms across the country have adopted a “do more with less” strategy. It’s a kamikaze mission.

Avatar_57x57

Payback

The sordid, petty world of “gossip item” sources for the New York Post and The Daily News, and what happens when they go bad.

Avatar_57x57

Tabloid Hack Attack on Royals

Tabloid newspapers were caught hacking into the voicemails of Prince William and Prince Harry. One reporter was arrested - but an investigation shows the eavesdropping was far more elaborate and widespread.

Avatar_57x57

Whirl

For sixty years, the weekly Evening Whirl attacked the drug lords, whoring preachers, and hypocritical bourgeoisie of St. Louis’ black community, sometimes in rhyming Iambic couplets.

Avatar_57x57

Correcting the Record

The New York Times reveals the deception of 27-year-old reporter Jayson Blair.

Avatar_57x57

The Savior of Condé Nast

Scott Dadich, 34, has been described by a former boss as a “combination of Pelé and Jesus” and is now tasked with figuring out the future of the magazine. All he’s got in his new Times Square office: an iPad and a book of George Lois’ Esquire covers.

Avatar_57x57

The Confessions of Bob Greene

Evidence of a decades-old hotel trist with a teenage intern costs a beloved Chicago columnist his job - and his identity.

Avatar_57x57

A Life Revealed

Seventeen years after taking the iconic "Afghan Girl" photograph for National Geographic, Steve McCurry went back to find her.

Avatar_57x57

Out of Iraq

A war correspondent decides to rent a house in Baghdad to save money. Complications ensue.

Avatar_57x57

The Story Behind a Nonfiction Novel

In January 1966–the same month In Cold Blood was first published–Truman Capote sat down with George Plimpton to discuss the new art form he liked to call “creative journalism.”

Avatar_57x57

Pulitzer Prize Is Withdrawn

On September 28, 1980, the Washington Post published a story by an ambitious young reporter about an 8-year-old boy addicted to heroin. The story won a Pulitzer. The boy didn’t exist.

Avatar_57x57

“Paywall Will Underperform”

An interview with Clay Shirky on “why no medium has ever survived the indifference of 25-year-olds.”

Avatar_57x57

Hack

The nihilistic confessions of a presidential campaign reporter who covered Giuliani, Huckabee, and Clinton for Newsweek.

Avatar_57x57

The City Where the Sirens Never Sleep

Detroit is dying. But it’s not dead yet. Just ask Charlie LeDuff.

Avatar_57x57

An Interview with David Remnick

“But the journalism itself is not free. It can’t be free. And if it is free, it’s not going to be very good.”

Avatar_57x57

Lost Exile

The rise and fall of The Exile, Russia’s angriest English-language newspaper.

Avatar_57x57

All The Dirt That’s Fit To Print

How the National Enquirer became a 2010 Pulitzer contender without straying from its roots as a supermarket tabloid.

Avatar_57x57

Look at me!

A young journalist’s low-paid odyssey through publications from the Hong Kong iMail to Gawker adrift in the “nothing-based economy.”

Avatar_57x57

How to Save the News

Yeah, you’ve seen that headline before. The difference? This time it’s not journalists trying to do the saving. It’s Google.

Avatar_57x57

Issue 9: The Intellectual Situation

The editors of N+1 recap the revolution that is/was the internet with pit-stops to survey the Bolshevik Revolution, the NYT’s messy relationship with tech, and the value of an ad.

Avatar_57x57

The Great West Coast Newspaper War

Murderous editors, allegations of insanity, connections to the Church of Satan, illegal predatory-pricing schemes, and more than $21 million on the line—the crazy alt-weekly war in San Francisco has it all.

Avatar_57x57

Making It Look Easy at the New Yorker

David Remnick, editor of the New Yorker, has written a new Obama biography expected to be a best-seller. His frugal streak has kept his staff intact. And yet, after a dozen years, he’s still the new guy at Condé Nast.