Avatar_57x57

A Conversation With New York Times Film Critic A.O. Scott

“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it's important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice.”

Tuesday, February 2

Avatar_57x57

How Chris Jackson Is Building a Black Literary Movement

A profile of the editor behind Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Between the World and Me, Jay Z’s Decoded, and more.

Monday, February 1

Avatar_57x57

The Bouvier Affair

How an art shipper took advantage of the market’s opaque rules and shadowy deal-making to rip off a Russian oligarch.

Monday, January 25

Avatar_57x57

Our Band Should Not Be Your Life

On the road with Quarterbacks, a young band at the bottom of the music industry.

Avatar_57x57

The Epic Fail of Hollywood’s Hottest Algorithm

According to the trades and his pitch to investors, Ryan Kavanaugh had found film business formula that couldn’t lose. It could. Unraveling a Tinseltown Ponzi scheme.

Tuesday, January 19

Avatar_57x57

The Mourning Anchor

On the talent, ego, and late father of Bryant Gumbel.

Monday, January 18

Avatar_57x57

The Polaroids of the Cowboy Poet

Chris Earnshaw began taking photographs of Washington, D.C. more than 40 years ago. By the time he paid a visit to a museum to tout his work, he had in his possession—in plastic bags and filing drawers—3,000 Polaroids of a city long gone.

Saturday, January 16

Avatar_57x57

How It Feels

An essay on depression, art, and growing up.

Thursday, January 14

Avatar_57x57

Wenner's World

How a hanger-on at the fringe of San Francisco’s rock scene built the Rolling Stone empire.

Monday, January 11

Avatar_57x57

Looking for Hemingway

On George Plimpton and the founders of The Paris Review.

Early in the fifties another young generation of American expatriates in Paris became twenty-six years old, but they were not Sad Young Men, nor were they Lost; they were the witty, irreverent sons of a conquering nation.

Tuesday, January 5

Avatar_57x57

In the Jungle

How legends of the American music industry made millions off the work of Solomon Linda, a Zulu tribesman who wrote “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” and died a pauper.

Avatar_57x57

Playing for Time

A father, his dying son, and the quest to make the most profound video game ever.

Previously: The Longform Guide to Video Game Visionaries