The Chronicle of Higher Education

14 articles
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The Search for Psychology's Lost Boy

An investigation into “Little Albert,” the famous test subject.

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Secrets From Belfast

An oral history project involving former IRA members becomes a prolonged court battle over a four-decade-old murder.

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The Science of Hatred

A Bosnian social psychologist who studies guilt and responsibility in the collective memory (and denial) of Sreberbica, which is “among the most scientifically documented mass killings in history.”

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Psychedelic Academe

Research into mind-altering drugs is back.

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The Shape of History

On historian Ian Morris and his predictions for humanity’s future.

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Power of Suggestion

Why psychologists love “priming.”

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"I Will Ruin Him"

On being stalked in the age of the Internet.

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Dream Map to a Mind Seized

A mother on her autistic child’s progression and regression.

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'Moral' Robots

The debate over autonomous lethal drones.

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The Strange Neuroscience of Immortality

The scientific case for brain preservation and mind uploading.

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The Unabomber's Pen Pal

Teaching Ted Kaczynski’s anti-technology ideas.

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Little Boy Lost

On a child diagnosed with autism:

The worst part was that I knew he sensed it, too. In the same way that I know when he wants vegetable puffs or puréed fruit by the subtle pitch of his cries, I could tell that he also perceived the change—and feared it. At night he was terrified to go to bed, needing to hold my fingers with one hand and touch my face with the other in order to get the few hours of sleep he managed. Every morning he was different. Another word was gone, another moment of eye contact was lost. He began to cry in a way that was untranslatable. The wails were not meant as messages to be decoded; they were terrified expressions of being beyond expression itself.

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Programmed for Love

Fifteen years ago, Sherry Turkle developed a little crush on a robot named Cog. Since then, the MIT professor has been studying our ever-increasing emotional reliance on technology. She’s not optimistic about where we’re headed.