The Guardian

83 articles
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The Sting

The long arm of the DEA reaches into Liberia to bust a cocaine trafficker.

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Why Would Anyone Want To Shoot a Sea Otter?

Perhaps because your people have always hunted them. But also because there’s demand in New York fashion circles for their pelts.

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The Original Corporate Raiders

The East India Company was once “too big to fail.”

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The Word-Hoard

The British and Irish have coined some fabulous terms to describe nature and landscrape. “Doofers” is the Scots’ term for horse-shit; “clinkerbell” means icicle in Hampshire.

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Bad Lieutenant

A leading Guantanamo interrogator was once a Chicago police detective accused of police brutality.

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Ebola: The Race To Find A Cure

It’s not just the virus that stands in the way, it’s bureaucratic logistics, and the frightening look of those hazmat suits.

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The Mystery of Mingering Mike

A draft dodger invents a pop music career for himself – without recording any songs.

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Bronx Beauty

A writer befriends a street addict in the Bronx – and then takes her back to her mother in Oklahoma.

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What Happened When I Confronted My Cruellest Troll

Trolls are frustrating, cruel and frightening creatures of the internet deep. But something surprising happens when one writer tries to deal with the worst of hers: He turns out to have a conscience.

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The Boy Who Didn't Come Back From Heaven: Inside A Bestseller's 'Deception'

Alex Malarkey co-wrote a bestselling book about a near-death experience. Last week he admitted he made it up. Why wasn’t anyone listening to a quadriplegic boy and a mother who simply wanted to tell the truth?

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My Life Under Armed Guard

Since exposing the Neapolitan mafia by publishing Gomorrah at age 27, Roberto Saviano has lived for nearly a decade under armed guard, shuttling between anonymous hotels and army barracks.

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The Murder That Has Obsessed Italy

“‘It’s like a novel,’ a newspaper editor once told me, shaking his head. When I recently asked Ruggeri, the chief investigator, to sum up the case, she stared at her desk and just said ‘incredible’ four times.”