The Virginia Quarterly Review

13 articles
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Voice and Hammer

He outsold Elvis, signed one of the first pay-for-play contracts and befriended Martin Luther King Jr. A profile of Harry Belafonte.

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The Rules of the Game

A history of the Hollywood publicity racket.

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A Threat to Public Order

The impossible task of touring a tractor factory in post-Soviet Belarus.

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Mother of God, Child of Zeus

On the perils and poisons of mining for gold in southeastern Peru.

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Loch Ness Memoir

A trip to Scotland and an investigation of enduring belief:

I remember reading about the deathbed confession, and how strangely sad it made me, even though I had not, at that point, believed in the monster for years. How much sadder, I wondered, would it make those who still believed in the existence of a monster in Loch Ness?

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Double Vision

The perspective-bending art of identical twins Trevor and Ryan Oakes.

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India’s Vanishing Vultures

The disappearance of a legendary scavenger could have dire consequences for a swelling human population.

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Maoists in the Forest

India’s greatest terror threat may not be militants slipping across the Pakistani border, but rather the homegrown Maoist rebels who control the villages of the interior.

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After the Fall

A trip to interview former South Vietnamese premiere Ky on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the reunification of Vietnam ends with government surveillance, partying, and confusion.

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The Christian with Four Aces

Pat Robertson was 29 years old, possessionless, and living in a Bed-Stuy brownstone when he announced that God had told him to buy a fledgling TV station in Virginia. Here’s what happened next.

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60 Hours of Terror

The defining, minute-by-minute account of the 2008 attacks in Mumbai.

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The Cocaine Coast

In nine hours, Guinea-Bissau’s President and military leader were assassinated in separate incidents. Their dealings had turned the country into the runway of choice for drug smugglers and Hezbollah.