Very Long

28 articles
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A profile of Merle Haggard.

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Published across three consecutive issues and later adapted into the book (and mini-series) Generation Kill, the story of bullets, bombs and a Marine platoon at war in Iraq.

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An inquiry into the assassination of Pakistan’s former Prime Minister.

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Michael Quinn took on the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints – and lost.

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“I am talking here about a time when I began to doubt the premises of all the stories I had ever told myself, a common condition but one I found troubling.”

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“Reg Smythe was the greatest British newspaper strip cartoonist of the 20th Century – and second only to Peanuts’ Charles Schulz on a global scale. So why don’t we treat him that way?”

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On June 4, 1989, the bodies of Jo, Michelle and Christe were found floating in Tampa Bay. This is the story of the murders, their aftermath, and the handful of people who kept faith amid the unthinkable.

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In short order, eight gay men in Texas were murdered by teenage boys.

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The inside story of the Affordable Care Act.

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In 1970s Britain, conservative philosophy was the preoccupation of a few half-mad recluses. Searching the library of my college, I found Marx, Lenin, and Mao, but no Strauss, Voegelin, Hayek, or Friedman. I found every variety of socialist monthly, weekly, or quarterly, but not a single journal that confessed to being conservative.

A young Brit goes against the political grain.

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Gentrification and its discontents in Paris, throughout the centuries.

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An examination of Mitt Romney’s record on abortion.

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The most dreadful men to live with are those who thus alternate between angel and devil.
Not long before she died, Anne Isabella Noel Byron gave a wide-ranging interview to the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Most notoriously, she accused her husband, Lord Byron, of carrying on a "secret adulterous intrigue" with his half-sister. The Atlantic lost 15,000 subscribers in the months following publication of this article.
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An essay on Orson Welles’ (and/or Herman Mankiewicz’s) 1941 film Citizen Kane.

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Traveling with President Clinton.

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Tom Wolfe on the development of ”New Journalism,” an unconventional reporting style which he helped to pioneer.

I had the feeling, rightly or wrongly, that I was doing things no one had ever done before in journalism. I used to try to imagine the feeling readers must have had upon finding all this carrying on and cutting up in a Sunday supplement. I liked that idea. I had no sense of being a part of any normal journalistic or literary environment.

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An annotated transcript:

MR. SEALE: [The marshals are carrying him through the door to the lockup.] I still want an immediate trial. You can’t call it a mistrial. I’m put in jail for four years for nothing? I want my coat.

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A newly minted, 34-year-old White House budget director gets a little too candid with a reporter profiling him during Ronald Reagan’s first year in office. Among Stockman’s many admissions: “None of us really understands what’s going on with all these numbers.”

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The writer and his girlfriend move to the Dominican Republic, joining the rapidly expanding community of expats who claim to have found paradise. They promptly get robbed at gunpoint. To cope, he investigates the country.

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Three Dallas prostitutes were found dead in as many months. Charles Albright might be the last person you’d suspect–unless you knew about his unique, lifelong obsession.

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He was just another coked-up agent (repping the likes of Steven Soderbergh) when he disappeared into Iraq, shooting heaps of footage he would attempt to package into a pro-war documentary. And that was just the beginning.

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Neal Stephenson’s three continent spanning “hacker tourist” account of the laying of the (then) longest wire on earth, FLAG, fiber-optic link around the world. A 42,000+ word business/tech/history epic.