New York Times Magazine

360 articles
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The Secret Sadness of Pregnancy with Depression

“We still have retrograde ideas about how pregnant women should feel, and we need to revise them — not only for depressed women but for all women.”

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How Do You Define a Gang Member?

If you’re in a gang, the law can impose harsh penalties. But even though the police think they’ve got all the signs of gang membership down pat, it turns out that you can’t really tell just by looking.

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Can China Take a Joke?

The culturally-bound mechanics of comedy.

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Judy Blume Knows All Your Secrets

“She has no theories, for example, to explain why she, of all people, felt unburdened by the unspoken rules marking certain subjects off limits for children, or why, for that matter, she has that particular gift, that ability to recall the emotional experiences of adolescence, the confusion, the longing, the rivalries — the memories, in other words, that most of us try to bury as quickly and deeply as we can.”

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The Last Day of Her Life

A gender studies professor, diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, decides to take control of her death.

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‘Our Demand Is Simple: Stop Killing Us.’

Following two leading figures of the #BlackLivesMatter movement through five months of protests.

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ZPM Espresso and the Rage of the Jilted Crowdfunder

What happens when a successfully funded Kickstarter product fails to launch?

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The Man Who Makes the World’s Funniest People Even Funnier

On Brent White, the joke whisperer who edits the largely improvisational comedies of Paul Feig, Judd Apatow and Adam McKay.

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Sally Mann's Exposure

In 1992, a magazine story introduced the world to the photographs of Sally Mann. Here, she responds to the firestorm that article produced.

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Jonathan Franzen's Big Book

Before The Corrections, Jonathan Franzen was just another literary novelist with a new book coming out.

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Stranger Still

Kamel Daoud’s celebrated retelling of Albert Camus’s The Stranger came within two votes of winning the Prix Goncourt. It has also made him a target of radical Islamists.