A screenshot of the Longform App in a stylized iPhone

Our Free New App for iPhone and iPad

  • Every pick from Longform.org
  • Follow any publisher or writer
  • All articles available offline
Download on the App Store

The Hairpin

7 articles
Avatar_57x57

Disrupters, Disconnectionists, and Dicks

On the host of MTV’s Catfish and his new book.

Avatar_57x57

The Marquise de Brinvilliers

On Marie-Madeline Marguerite, a 1600s French serial killer.

This is the second installment in The Hairpin's "Lady Killers" series. Previously: "The Blood Countess."

Avatar_57x57

The Blood Countess

On Erzsébet Báthory, the first—and still most prolific—female serial killer.

Avatar_57x57

Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Ecstasy of Hedy Lamarr

“Let me say that again: Hedy Lamarr, arguably the most glamorous star of the pre-war period, also helped invent your cell phone and WiFi connection.”

Avatar_57x57

An Interview With Thom Steinbeck

“I didn’t realize who my father was. So it didn’t make a whole lot of difference. I wasn’t there believing that I was receiving genius from on high. My father was my father.”

Avatar_57x57

Scandals of Classic Hollywood: Cary Grant's Intimate Bromance

The phrase “knew how to wear clothes” is a loaded one. To “know how to wear clothes” is another way of saying that Cary Grant embodied class, which is to say high class: Grant wore well-tailored clothes, and he knew how to hold himself in them. But he came from nothing, and the way he wore clothes was just as much of a performance as his refined trans-Atlantic accent, his acrobatic slapstick routines, and his masterful flirtation skills.
Avatar_57x57

Our Bella, Ourselves

Because women and girls don’t always kick ass, and neither should our heroines:

Bella Swan, by contrast, is a much more honest though cringe-inducing representation of adolescence. She doesn’t know who she is or what she wants. She’s clumsy, obtuse, and aggravating in her helplessness. She is also entirely internal, almost alienatingly so. One of my favorite passages from the novel New Moon is when Stephenie Meyer inserts a series of blank pages to stand in for the months that pass while Bella mourns — out of any reasonable proportion — Edward’s desertion. Bella, kind of wonderfully, takes her time.