Washington Post

72 articles
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In an old mine an hour north of Pittsburgh, 600 federal employees manage paperwork for the government’s retirement system. By hand. On paper. Without computers. The same exact way they always have.

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Hunting Marlon Brando.

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On hit-and-run deaths, and in particular, that of Tiara Nichelle Jackson on the Beltway.

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An unlikely bipartisan alliance attempts to get Yes into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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“In all his life, this was the moment of his greatest defeat.” On the death of George McGovern’s daughter on a cold winter night in Madison, Wisconsin.

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Eleven years ago, three-year-old Audrey Santo fell into a pool. She nearly drowned. Much of her brain died. She cannot speak, can only barely move. And every Wednesday, pilgrims show up at her family’s house, ready for a miracle.

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How living off food stamps is making South Texans obese but leaving them hungry.

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Ignored early warnings, political pressure, and a botched Obamacare rollout.

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A profile of the policy wonk who shone the light and turned the tide on overseas tax havens.

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Why a freshman congressman can’t get his bill passed.

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The quiet life of Brigette Höss, 80, whose father ran Auschwitz.

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Chris, a 25-year-old black man, tries to get a good job.

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A profile of long-time White House butler Eugene Allen. This article served as inspiration for the recent movie “Lee Daniels’ The Butler.”

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Navigating life as a brilliant teenage girl.

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“Jeffrey Levitt stole and misappropriated a grand total of fourteen million, six hundred ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred forty-seven dollars and fifty-eight cents. He stole all that. It was the largest single white-collar crime in Maryland history, almost bringing down the state’s entire savings and loan industry.” And it still wasn’t enough.

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A week in the life of Naomi and Spencer Haskell.

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A daughter’s attempt to solve the riddle of her mom.

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The story of three peace activists — a drifter, an 82-year-old nun and a house painter — who penetrated the exterior of Y-12 in Tennessee, supposedly one of the most secure nuclear-weapons facilities in the United States.

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Dillie Nerios’s job is to convince people food is a right, not a luxury.

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“He has hit rock bottom, and he just hasn’t accepted it yet.” Basketball’s iconoclast is a broke recluse at 37.

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On the American teenager who was kidnapped by Islamic militants while on vacation in the Philippines.

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The economics of Woonsocket, where one-third of residents rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

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After being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a 30-year-old woman loses most of her memory.

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A profile of 11th-grader Tabitha Rouzzo.

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More than forty years later, tracking down an elementary school crush.

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A profile of George McGovern.

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Frank Firetti, a 54-year-old pool salesman in Virginia, and his fading American dream.

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A Kosovar refugee must decide between love and family.

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Ten years after D.C. area sniper shootings, an interview with Lee Boyd Malvo.

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By day, Dan Brown runs the seafood counter at SuperFresh. By night, he does his life work: clearing, dressing, and sharing road-killed deer.

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A profile of Larry King at the height of his fame and on the heels of his sixth divorce.

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The Watergate reporters look back.

In the course of his five-and-a-half-year presidency, beginning in 1969, Nixon launched and managed five successive and overlapping wars — against the anti-Vietnam War movement, the news media, the Democrats, the justice system and, finally, against history itself. All reflected a mind-set and a pattern of behavior that were uniquely and pervasively Nixon’s: a willingness to disregard the law for political advantage, and a quest for dirt and secrets about his opponents as an organizing principle of his presidency.

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The parallel lives of a KGB defector and his CIA handler.

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As U.S. troops departed, Baghdad in ruins.

Winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting. While on assignment for the New York Times, Anthony Shadid died today in Syria.
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A profile of the Final Exit Network's former medical director:
In those final seconds before his patients lose consciousness and die, the words they utter sound like Donald Duck, he says, imitating the high-pitched, nasally squeak familiar to any child who has sucked a gulp from a helium balloon. So, this is how a human being can leave this Earth? Sounding like Donald Duck?
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An attempt to recruit black students at Virginia’s most famous “segregation academy.”

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On the privilege of being then-Vice President George H.W. Bush.

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Retracing the early economic steps of the Obama administration.

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Karen Holloman opened the door of her uncle's apartment with his best friend, Larry Young, a step behind. As they edged inside, she looked to her left and saw the end of her uncle's bed and his motionless feet. "He's been in here asleep all along," Holloman muttered, for a moment annoyed at the worry he had caused by not answering his phone. Her anger froze as she entered his room: The Rev. Marvin Moore lay dead in his bed, a bullet hole through the back of his head, a pool of blood gathered beneath his limp arm.
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A search for the “armpit of America” ends in Battle Mountain, Nevada.

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A profile of Maine’s two U.S. senators, Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins.

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On writing what you loathe. Leslie McFarlane, ghostwriter of the early Hardy Boys novels, was so ashamed of the work he couldn’t even bring himself to name the books in his diary. “June 9, 1933: Tried to get at the juvenile again today but the ghastly job appalls me.”

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Arnold Weiss escaped Germany as a kid in 1938, leaving his family behind. He returned seven years later, now a U.S. intelligence officer tasked with tracking down fugitive Nazis. The ultimate revenge story.

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The cops thought they had captured a fugitive. They had not. Elias Fishburne was a hairdresser from Maryland and was going to jail.

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What happened next for Harry Whittington, the guy Cheney shot in the face? Not an apology.

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According to this excerpt from Woodward’s Obama's Wars, the president’s military advisors gave him only one option: send an additional 40,000 troops. Obama pushed back.

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A 2009 profile of the guy behind 4chan, Christoper “moot” Poole, his anonymous army of millions, and how it’s all losing him money.

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The story of a deadly collision on the D.C. Metro, told from surviving passengers’ point of view.

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On September 28, 1980, the Washington Post published a story by an ambitious young reporter about an 8-year-old boy addicted to heroin. The story won a Pulitzer. The boy didn’t exist.

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How USAID workers are trained for work and danger in Afghanistan.

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A woman posing as a non-profit worker kidnaps a formerly homeless pregnant woman and tries to claim her baby. [PART 2]
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A woman posing as a non-profit worker kidnaps a formerly homeless pregnant woman and tries to claim her baby. [PART 1]
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[Part 2 of 2] The story behind this spring’s spate of retributive murders in Southwest D.C.
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[Part 1 of 2] The story behind this spring's spate of retributive murders in Southwest D.C.
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In 2003, Gary Coleman ran for governor of California. But what he really wanted was to have never come to Hollywood in the first place.

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The dark secret life of The Great Zucchini, Washington D.C.’s most sought after children’s birthday party entertainer.

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Forgetting a child in the backseat of a car is a horrifying mistake. But is it a crime? (A newly minted Pulitzer Prize winner.)