The Atlantic

208 articles
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How White Flight Ravaged the Mississippi Delta

For generations, plantation owners strove to keep black laborers on the farm and competing businesses out of town. Today, the towns faring best are the ones whose white residents stayed to reckon with their own history.

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The Tragedy of the American Military

The United States fights wars it can’t win using soldiers it doesn’t know.

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The Zen Predator of the Upper East Side

Nearly 50 years ago, a penniless monk arrived in Manhattan, where he began to build an unrivaled community of followers—and a reputation for sexual abuse.

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The Minister Who Went to Jail for Financial-Aid Fraud

Ozel Clifford Brazil was a respected clergyman who helped thousands of African-American teens go to college. He broke the law to do it.

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Let’s Die Together

The rise of anonymous group suicide in Japan.

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1491

The Western Hemisphere before Columbus.

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Why I Hope to Die at 75

Rejecting the “American immortal” mentality.

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How Gangs Took Over Prisons

Maintaining order behind bars.

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The Afghan Girls Who Live as Boys

Posing for family survival in a society that values boys over girls.

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The Force That Drives the Flower

On the universal drive to grow and reproduce.

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Acting French

On learning a new language, a new culture, and why “it must never be concluded that an urge toward the cosmopolitan, toward true education, will make people stop hitting you.”

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The War Photo No One Would Publish

When Kenneth Jarecke photographed the charred remains of an Iraqi soldier during the Gulf War, he thought it might help challenge the popular narrative of a clean, uncomplicated battle. He was wrong.