Wednesday, November 12

Longform Podcast #117: Reihan Salam

Reihan Salam is the executive editor of National Review.

"I’m incredibly curious about other people. I’m curious about what they think of as the constraints operating on their lives. Why do they think what they think? If I weren’t doing this job, I’d want to be a high school guidance counselor."

Thanks to TinyLetter, Bonobos, and Cards Against Humanity’s Ten Days or Whatever of Kwanzaa for sponsoring this week's episode.

Show notes »
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The Knowledge, London’s Legendary Taxi-Driver Test, Puts Up a Fight in the Age of GPS

For at least 130 years, cabbies in London have been taking what many believe is the hardest test in the world: through a series of oral exams that takes four years to complete, they must prove that know every one of the city’s 25,000 streets, every business and every landmark.

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"Did You Ever Mind It?"

Thoughts on race and adoption.

Tuesday, November 11

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Double Jeopardy

A jury recommends life in prison; the judged orders a death sentence.

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Tristan Walker: The Visible Man

On an African-American entrepreneur and race in Silicon Valley.

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Hello, My Name Is Stephen Glass, and I’m Sorry

Sixteen years after he was exposed as the most fraudulent journalist of his generation, Stephen Glass is confronted by an old friend.

Monday, November 10

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A Birth Story

Fuck everything, I thought. Bring on the cascading interventions. And they came.”

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How Detroit Was Reborn

The inside story of how the city, broke and bleak and nearing the edge, saved itself.

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Unravelling the Mystery Behind L'Wren Scott's Path to Self-Destruction

L’Wren Scott went from bullied Mormon teen to international model to Hollywood stylist to fashion designer, becoming Mick Jagger’s girlfriend in the process. In March, she took her own life.

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All Dressed Up For Mars and Nowhere to Go

Mars One says it will send four people to colonize the planet by 2025. The company claims more than 200,000 have paid to apply for the privilege. But a deep look at Mars One’s plan and its finances reveals that not only is the goal a longshot, it might be a scam.

Sunday, November 9